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New modular clinic installed in de-occupied village in Mykolaiv oblast as part of cooperation between the Ministry of Health and WHO

17 January 2024
57

A new modular primary healthcare clinic is now operating in Bilozirka village, Mykolaiv oblast. The outpatient clinic was set up as part of a partnership between the Ministry of Health of Ukraine and the World Health Organization to provide patients with access to the necessary medical care despite the full-scale war.

“Every day we see the russian army systematically shelling Ukraine’s civilian infrastructure, including hospitals. As of today, 1,508 facilities have been damaged and another 195 medical facilities have been destroyed to the ground. The Ministry of Health and the WHO are working together to provide Ukrainians with access to the most necessary primary health care services in the de-occupied and most affected by the war areas. This includes the installation of modular primary healthcare clinics and the restoration of Ukraine’s medical infrastructure. We are ready to respond promptly and provide a powerful response to the challenges posed by a full-scale war so that every patient has unimpeded access to medical care wherever they are,” said Minister of Health of Ukraine Viktor Liashko.

It should be noted that Mykolaiv oblast has been under continuous shelling and air strikes since the beginning of the war, resulting in many civilian infrastructure facilities, including medical facilities, being damaged or destroyed. In addition, part of the region, including the village of Bilozirka, was occupied by russians at the beginning of the war. Therefore, medical care in the region was extremely difficult. After the liberation of the territories, a modular clinic was set up in the community to improve patients’ access to primary health care.

“The installation of modular primary healthcare facilities and emergency medical stations is one of the key WHO response and recovery projects in Ukraine. It is aimed at providing residents of rural communities and those returning home with access to much-needed medical care. Although this is a temporary solution that offers an immediate and long-term solution to an acute problem, modular clinics are important for building trust in the healthcare system,” said Dr. Jarno Habicht, WHO Representative in Ukraine.

The temporary modular clinic in Bilozirka village is staffed by a doctor and two nurses. The medical facility will serve about 1300 patients. The capacity is 15 patients per day and 75 patients per week.

It should also be noted that the new clinic is equipped with the necessary amenities, including electricity, sanitary facilities, waiting rooms, and patient examination rooms.

The outpatient clinic is also ready to work in blackouts and is equipped with generators for uninterrupted power supply.

For reference: such clinics can serve as a replacement for damaged facilities for up to 10 years. A total of 14 modular facilities have already been installed in Kherson, Kharkiv, Sumy, and Mykolaiv oblasts. The Humanitarian Foundation for Ukraine (UHF) provided the necessary financial support for this project.